10 uses for your old Christmas tree

10 uses for your old Christmas tree

We all look forward to decorating our Christmas tree but now that Christmas is over it’s time it comes down.

Real trees are as popular as ever but rather than just bin it why not recycle your tree to get some extra use out of it?

When the festive period is over, take down the tinsel, but don’t bag the tree. Its needles, boughs, and trunk can do more than hold ornaments.

Here’s 10 tips that you could use to ensure your dead tree lives a little longer…

1 Mulch with needles

Pine needles dry quickly and decompose slowly, making them an excellent moisture- and mold-free mulch for ground-covering crops, such as strawberries, to rest on.

2 Create a Bird Sanctuary

Place your tree in its stand outdoors. Fill bird feeders and hang them from the boughs, or drape the tree with a swag of pinecones coated with peanut butter

3 Insulate perennials

Cut off boughs and lay them over perennial beds to protect them from snow and reduce frost heaving.

4 Edge your borders

Cut the trunk into 2-inch discs and set them into the soil to edge flower beds or walkways.

5 Shelter fish

If you live near a lake or have a pond, and your tree’s chemical-free, toss branches into the water to provide sheltering habitat for overwintering fish. (Get permission from town officials if needed).

6 Set a stage for containers

Saw the trunk into different lengths and use the pieces as flowerpot risers for a dramatic group display.

7 Make coasters and trivets

Cut thin slabs off the trunk, sand them smooth, and apply a thin coat of polyurethane to keep the sap off tables and glassware.

8 Chip it

Rent a chipper and feed the tree through it. Next spring, spread the wood chips under shrubs; they’ll suppress weeds and, as they decompose, add nutrients to the soil.

9 Feed a fire pit

It’s fine to use a few of the quick-to-ignite branches to start an outdoor fire pit—but never in an indoor fireplace, where creosote build-up is a hazard.

10 Stake your plants

Strip small branches and use the remaining twigs to support indoor potted plants or stake leggy seedlings.

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